Numbers in Spanish

Lesson 8



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Let's get started with Lesson 8 - Numbers in Spanish

(1)SPANISH LESSON SUMMARY

This lesson we shall learn numbers from 1 to 100.

We shall learn that there are three options for the number "1". We shall learn the correct way to use each one.

And we shall note mistakes that are easily made when first learning numbers in Spanish, so that you can consciously avoid them.

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(2)SPANISH LESSON CONTENT & AUDIO

Listen & repeat
- 1 to 10

1 to 10

Listen & repeat
- 11 to 20

11 to 20

  
Listen & repeat
- 21 to 40

21 to 40

Listen & repeat
- 41 to 100

41 to 100


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Numbers in Spanish

un/uno   1 veintiuno   21 cuarenta y uno   41
dos   2 veintidós   22 cuarenta y dos   42
tres   3 veintitrés   23 cuarenta y tres   43
quatro   4 veinticuatro   24 cuarenta y cuatro   44
cinco   5 veinticinco   25 cuarenta y cinco   45
seis   6 veintiséis   26   
siete   7 veintisiete   27 cincuenta   50
ocho   8 veintiocho   28 cincuenta y uno   51
nueve   9 veintinueve   29 cincuenta y dos   52
diez   10 treinta   30   
once   11 treinta y uno   31 sesenta   60
doce   12 treinta y dos   32 sesenta y uno   61
trece   13 treinta y tres   33 sesenta y dos   62
catorce   14 treinta y cuatro   34   
quince   15 treinta y cinco   35 setenta   70
dieciséis   16 treinta y seis   36 setenta y uno   71
diecisiete   17 treinta y siete   37   
dieciocho   18 treinta y ocho   38 ochenta   80
diecinueve   19 treinta y nueve   39 noventa   90
veinte   20 cuarenta   40 cien   100
Numbers in Spanish

un/uno   1
dos   2
tres   3
quatro   4
cinco   5
seis   6
siete   7
ocho   8
nueve   9
diez   10
once   11
doce   12
trece   13
catorce   14
quince   15
dieciséis   16
diecisiete   17
dieciocho   18
diecinueve   19
veinte   20
veintiuno   21
veintidós   22
veintitrés   23
veinticuatro   24
veinticinco   25
veintiséis   26
veintisiete   27
veintiocho   28
veintinueve   29
treinta   30
treinta y uno   31
treinta y dos   32
treinta y tres   33
treinta y cuatro   34
treinta y cinco   35
treinta y seis   36
treinta y siete   37
treinta y ocho   38
treinta y nueve   39
cuarenta   40
cuarenta y uno   41
cuarenta y dos   42
cuarenta y tres   43
cuarenta y cuatro   44
cuarenta y cinco   45
  
cincuenta   50
cincuenta y uno   51
cincuenta y dos   52
  
sesenta   60
sesenta y uno   61
sesenta y dos   62
  
setenta   70
setenta y uno   71
  
ochenta   80
noventa   90
cien   100

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Lesson 8 - Numbers in Spanish


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(3)SPANISH LESSON EXPLANATION & NOTES

Numbers in Spanish: Starting with the Number One

Notice that the number one above has two options: "un" and "uno". Technically, there is yet another option: "una" (the feminine equivalent of each).

They all mean "one" but are used under different circumstances. Tricky, huh? No, it doesn't have to be.

"Un" is used where in English we could replace it with "a" to mean the same thing.

Here's an example.

In English:
"I have a white cat" or "I have one white cat."
In Spanish:
"Yo tengo un gato blanco."
(There's only one way to say it in Spanish. The context of the conversation will determine whether "un" means "a" or "one".)

"Uno" is always used without a noun.

This means that it must have no noun directly after it (although other kinds of words may follow it).

Here are some examples.

In English:
"Do you have two dogs?" "No, I have one."
In Spanish:
"¿Tú tienes dos perros?" "No, yo tengo uno."

In English:
"I have a white cat." "I have a white one too."
In Spanish:
"Yo tengo un gato blanco." "Yo tengo uno blanco también."


Note: The second example shows how to say "a white one" in Spanish - you simply say "uno blanco" ("one white").

To say "
two white ones" in Spanish, you say "dos blancos" ("two whites") - notice that "white" also becomes plural.

"
Three white ones" is "tres blancos" ("three whites"), etc.

In the last example above, notice how "un" is used in the first sentence because it is followed by a noun, but "uno" is used in the second sentence because it is not followed by a noun - in that particular example it is followed by an adjective.

"Una" is the feminine version for both of the above.

In other words, "una" can mean both "one" and "a" and it is used both with and without nouns after it.

Here's an example.

In English:
"I have a white house." "I have a white one too."

In Spanish:
"Yo tengo una casa blanca." "Yo tengo una blanca también."

Remember that, in Spanish, "una" must be used because "la casa" is feminine. All genders must agree.

If in doubt, here's a simpler way to work out which to use ...

In your sentence, if "one" can be replaced with "a" in English to mean the same thing (or vice versa), then use "un" or "una" in Spanish.

In your sentence, if "one" cannot be replaced with "a" in English, then use "uno" or "una" in Spanish.


Numbers in Spanish: Twenties, Thirties, etc.

Notice - in the numbers in Spanish above - that there are two letters highlighted in red? The difference between the two is something to get right from the start.

As in English, numbers in Spanish between 1 and 20 are all unique. There's no way out but to learn these. Regular listening to the Spanish audio will make them second nature.

Numbers in Spanish between 30 and 100 all follow a similar pattern:
"treinta y uno" (thirty and one),
"treinta y dos" (thirty and two),
"treinta y tres" (thirty and three), etc.

Therefore, once you've learned numbers 1 to 10, numbers between 30 and 100 are fairly straight forward.

For numbers in Spanish between 20 and 30, however, this pattern is a little bit different.
You do not say "veinte y uno". Instead, "veinte y ..." becomes just "veinti-" and the whole number is then all one word.

This is a spelling rule worth noting if you ever intend to write in Spanish.

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Do you think you've spotted an error?

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(4)KEY POINTS OF SPANISH LESSON

There are two different options in Spanish for the number "1":
"un"/"una" and "uno"/"una".

Learning which one to use where is a must.

Although rules can be learned to work out which one is correct, regular listening to Spanish audio will ensure that no working out is necessary - you will be surprised at how quickly you simply know what sounds right.

Finally, watch out for the difference in Spanish pronunciation and spelling between numbers 20-to-30 and 30-to-100.

(5)NEW VOCABULARY

Lesson 8 - Numbers in Spanish
New Spanish Vocabulary List



Español English
 

cinco five

seis six

siete seven

ocho eight

nueve nine

diez ten

once eleven

doce twelve

trece thirteen

catorce fourteen

quince fifteen

dieciséis sixteen

diecisiete seventeen

dieciocho eighteen

diecinueve nineteen

veinte twenty

veintiuno twenty-one

veintidós twenty-two

veintitrés twenty-three

veinticuatro twenty-four

veinticinco twenty-five

veintiséis twenty-six

veintisiete twenty-seven

veintiocho twenty-eight

veintinueve twenty-nine

cuarenta forty

sesenta sixty

setenta seventy

ochenta eighty

noventa ninety

cien one hundred

Proceed to Lesson 9 - Spanish ER Verbs - Present Tense Part II >>>

<<< Or return to Lesson 7 - Spanish AR Verbs - Present Tense Part I





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